The Messianic Jewish Rabbinical Council (MJRC) was formally established in May 2006. It consists of a group of ordained Messianic Jewish Rabbis and associated leaders who share a common vision for Messianic Jewish practice rooted in Torah, instructed by Tradition, and faithful to Messiah Yeshua in the twenty-first century.

The MJRC had its beginnings five years earlier. At that time a set of Messianic Jewish leaders from New England invited some of their colleagues from outside the region to join them in working on a common set of halakhic standards for themselves and their congregations. 

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kinzer-book

MJRC Rabbi Dr. Mark Kinzer has just released Searching Her Own Mystery, which promises to become a major resource in Messianic Jewish dialogue with the Roman Catholic Church and the Christian world in general. Rabbi Kinzer argues that the Church has yet to explore adequately the implications of the seminal Catholic document Nostra Aetate for Christian self-understanding. The publication announcement from Cascade Books states:

The new Catholic teaching concerning Israel should produce fresh perspectives on the entire range of Christian theology, including Christology, ecclesiology, and the theology of the sacraments. To this end, Kinzer proposes an Israel-ecclesiology rooted in Israel-Christology in which a restored ecclesia ex circumcisione—the “church from the circumcision”—assumes a crucial role as a sacramental sign of the Church’s bond with the Jewish people and genealogical-Israel’s irrevocable election.

Dr. Kinzer is Rabbi of Congregation Zera Avraham in Ann Arbor, Michigan, President Emeritus of Messianic Jewish Theological Institute, and former chairman of the UMJC Theology Committee.

Yasher koach to Rabbi Kinzer!

To see the full announcement, with ordering information, click here.

by Rabbi Nathan Joiner

What’s Cooking?

Camp Or L’Dor is a 10-day summer adventure where Jewish life and Messiah Yeshua combine to create an exciting, action-packed, and transforming spiritual experience for Messianic Jewish teens.

Every year, Jewish teens fly in from around the country to our serene camp location in the Northeast. In addition to lively daily services, lessons, and campfire discussions, we play sports, paintball, balance on high ropes courses, and careen through the air on zip lines. But it’s not all crazy activities; we also host drama competitions, improv workshops, and a talent show. To top it all off, we set out on a 2-night hiking or canoe trip to experience community and G-d in the wilderness.

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ark-bima

 

"The MJRC consists of ordained Rabbis and associates who promote a life of faithfulness to God's covenant among Jewish followers of Messiah Yeshua by providing realistic and practical guidelines for Messianic Jewish observance."

Our Mission Statement

Rooted in Torah, instructed by Tradition, faithful to Messiah Yeshua

MJRC

The Messianic Jewish Rabbinical Council (MJRC) consists of ordained Rabbis and associates who promote a life of faithfulness to God's covenant among Jewish followers of Messiah Yeshua by providing realistic and practical guidelines for Messianic Jewish observance.

Our core mission is to define, clarify, and foster standards of observance for council members and for those in the Messianic Jewish community who look to us for leadership.

We also exist to serve the professional and personal needs of our members by fostering high standards of professional competence, ethical behavior, and halakhic conduct.

The Messianic Jewish Rabbinical Council (MJRC) was formally established in May 2006. It consists of a group of ordained Messianic Jewish Rabbis and associated leaders who share a common vision for Messianic Jewish practice rooted in Torah, instructed by Tradition, and faithful to Messiah Yeshua in the twenty-first century.

The MJRC had its beginnings five years earlier. At that time a set of Messianic Jewish leaders from New England invited some of their colleagues from outside the region to join them in working on a common set of halakhic standards for themselves and their congregations.